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DispatchFactbookOverview

by The Holy Green Nationstates Isle of Ko-oren. . 196 reads.

Languages

The current language situation includes several modern languages of the multiverse that are spoken in multiple nations. These include English (south, central-west), French (southern bay), Dutch (northern bay), Japanese (eastern islands), a Celtic dialect (southwest), and a Romance dialect (southeastern peninsula). On top of that, some of Ko-oren's surviving languages include Gehrennan Ko-orenite (western bay), Altioran Ko-orenite (northern islands), Tarrashall Ko-orenite (northwest) and several dialects spoken mainly as second languages in smaller areas. Aviansola Ko-orenite (eastern islands) is the most prevalent example of a smaller dialect.

Most Ko-orenites will have a clear first language, but will often speak a second language. Many are fluent in a third one. Typically, a Ko-orenite has a (minimal) passive understanding of about 1-2 languages on top of those. The eastern islands are an exception in that people speak both Japanese and Aviansola Ko-orenite.

Placenames largely follow the current language situation. A French-speaking city would have a French-sounding name, for instance. Some examples of Ko-oren's native languages:
- Gehrennan: Maethoru, Senoren, Gehrenna, Mayara
- Altioran: Aevanna, Aerellen, Arboren, Egevea
- Tarrashall: Aralla, Tarrashall, Jillong, Myaranowra
- Aviansola: Alara, Aviansola, Suvira, Lejana

People's names also largely follow the current language situation. First names are often chosen to come from the same culture as the person's last name.

Index
Gehrennan
Ko-orenite English
Finisterran
Japanese

Gehrennan
Gehrennan is the most widely spoken native language of Ko-oren. It is the language of government and most official life, as well as the language used in about a million households in Ko-oren. It is certainly not the most common first language on the archipelago, but it is understood by a decent majority of the population.

Common name

Gehrennan original

Aminey

Amahne

Willowbourne

Ilohbonu

Greencaster

Garihnkatar

Schemerdrecht

Shemurdar

Sterrenwolde

Seterbohdu

Katashi

Katahshi

Santa Teresa

Tehresa

Ferrovente

Erpubehte

Llandy

Alahdi

Mawrystwyth

Marapsathi

Maynard

Menamar

Idyllwild

Edihlbahl

Eaglebury

Igolibah

Straudum

Seredu

Amillon

Amalo

Étouille

Etubi

Cirelbourne

Shihrekhan

Bruncester

Burahzhandur

Furune

Fuhnur

Ko-orenite English
Verbs
Generally, where there is a choice between regular past tense or irregular past tense, the irregular past tense is used. Except for the verb to go, which uses goed in most cases. Went is only used as a past tense of to go if 1) the action is not undertaken regularly, normally, or usually, OR 2) it involves returning from a location.

Some examples:
Go -> Goed, Went
Abide -> Abode
Arise -> Arose
[...]Cast -> [...]Cast (incl. Forecast, Broadcast)
Clothe -> Clad
Shear -> Shore

Spelling/Orthography
Ko-orenite English uses British spelling. Over time, there have been limited attempts at creating a more regular orthography, but these aren't used anymore.

Finisterran

Common words/affix

Spanish

Portuguese

Finisterran

Articles

El/la, los/las

O/a, os/as

lo/la, los/las

Singular personal pronouns

Yo, tú, él, ella

Eu, tu, ele, ela

Eu, tu, el, ela

Enclitic pronouns (object, male)

-lo

-o, -lo, -no

-(e)lo

Digraphs

ñ, ll

nh, lh

nh, ll

Verbs - Indicative

Present

Imperfect

Perfect

Future

1st singular

-o

-*va

-e

-ro

2nd singular

-*s

-*vas

-*te

-ras

3rd singular

-

-*va

-e

-ra

1st plural

-*mos

-*vaos

-*imos

-r*mos

2nd plural

-*is

-*vais

-*ites

-reis

3rd plural

-*n

-*van

-*iran

-ran

Verbs - Subjunctive

Present

Imperfect

Perfect

Future

1st singular

-e

-*se

-te

-ero

2nd singular

-es

-*ses

-tes

-eras

3rd singular

-e

-*se

-te

-era

1st plural

-emos

-*sos

-temos

-eramos

2nd plural

-eis

-*seis

-teis

-ereis

3rd plural

-en

-*sen

-ten

-eran

The Perfect, especially in spoken language, is formed by a 'to have'/'to be' conjugation with the past participle of the verb.

Finisterran has no nasalisation as in Portuguese (ão, etc). Word-final <e> and <o> are pronounced /i/ and /u/. Word-final <te> and <de> are pronounced /t̠ʃi/ and /d̠ʒi/. Word-final nasal consonants are written and pronounced <n> and /n/ (instead of Portuguese <m> and /m/). Adjectives and prepositions do contract (en una -> enna). Enclitic pronouns are also used (Ves tu (Do you see) -> Vestu)

The sun and the north wind Lo vento de norte e lo sol discutiran quen ere lo mazo furto. Lo vento dice: "Vestu lo anseno envolto enna capa? Apuestote aque ele haze tirar la capa primeiro que tu." Lo sol ocultese atranna nuvem e lo vento comenze a soplar. Ele sople furtamente, mais e mais intensamente, pero lo anseno envoltese enna capa, quanto mais lo vento sople. Por fin lo vento calmese e declarese vencido. E entao lo sol sonre benignamente sobre lo anseno e lo anseno tire sa capa causa de calor. Lo vento de norte deve a confessar que lo sol ere lo mazo furto.

Japanese

Regular name

Kanji

Yoshima

四島

Alara

瑕媠

Etena

図立南

Selesi

青苓芝

Leleia

麗嶺野

Katashi

潟市

Echizen

鈌銭

Teragaseki

寺ヶ石

Furune

振音

Arakura

瑕倉

Nitoya

二十家

Aviansola

亜冷ノ空

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