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by The Dutch Democratic Republic of Knootoss. . 38 reads.

Adapted Schwerpunkt Armoured Platform (ASAP)

The Adapted Schwerpunkt Armoured Platform (ASAP) is a Knootian adaptation of the Wheeled Universal Armored Platform (WUAP) that was developed by the AFV division of Schwerpunkt in Nachmere. Changes include the introduction of the serial hybrid-electric Zenviron engine, an armoured skirt, 360-degree external view goggles and increased compatibility with the CAESAR combat management system. The platform is highly modular, allowing for a great number of shared characteristics, which are described below.

Mobility
For mobility and power-generation the vehicle relies on on the serial hybrid-electric Zenviron engine, which combines an in-hub electric drivetrain with two 150 horsepower gas turbines to top up the battery. Operational range has been sacrificed to gain fuel economies (in non-combat situations) and for the ability to enter an electric-only, virtually silent operating mode wherein the vehicle has a greatly reduced thermal signature. While idle, the silent electric power generator can also be used to power telecommunications, surveillance, targeting and other battlefield equipment. Regenerative braking can be used to recharge the batteries and an extended cable allows for the vehicle to be plugged into the electric mains system to recharge the battery bank.

While efficient and reasonably reliable, the engine parts do experience a higher wear rate due to their higher working speeds. The turbine blades have proven to be highly sensitive to dust and fine sand, so that in desert operations air filters have to be fitted and changed several times daily. The redundant gas turbine serves to lessen the impact of filter problems, but they do complicate maintenance and repairs in the field further. Range moreover depends on terrain and speed, limiting the ability of the vehicle to maintain high speeds on rough terrain for an extended period of time without compromising its operational range.

The engine has been coupled to an 8X8 drive system that can have all eight wheels running off-road, while only using four or two two while on-road. The pneumatic suspension consists of eight integrated pneumatic spring and damper units, connected to a central system. This allows for setting the ground clearance according to need. The run-flat tires are connected to a central pressure system allowing the driver to set tire pressure separately for each tire, and providing warning when the tire pressure is incorrect for the load and speed of the vehicle.

The Adapted Schwerpunkt Armoured Platform is fully amphibious and can move through water by using twin propellers. Before entering the water, a splash vane must be erected on the front of the vehicle and bilge pumps switched on.

Battlefield Awareness and Communication
Hidden digital camera's have been dispersed throughout the hull, allowing the driver and the commander to 'see through' the hull using the HUD that is typically issued to Knootian Landmacht officers. The rotating thermal viewer mounted on the hatch, the rotating day/night IIR system and a night time light intensifying system have been integrated into this design. As a backup, the driver can rely on a periscope with a 180 degree field of view while the commander has multiple periscopes, allowing nearly 270 degrees of vision.

Contact points exist for the crew's PDA's, allowing en-route charging and networking capabilities, including use of an internal communications system, with the option to use short-range wireless headsets that have been built into the crew's ballistic helmets. A Battlefield Management and Navigation computer is installed, allowing interface with the national CAESAR Battlefield Management System. This allows the on-board displays to display and network accurate real-time information not only of friendly forces, but also of hostile forces, terrain conditions and more.

Most vehicles feature 3 transmitter-receivers and 2 receivers, antenna bases being integral for external communication. The antenna bases allow for lowering the antennas forwards and backwards from inside. A telephone located in the passenger compartment of the variants that accommodate passengers is connected to the commander’s internal communications.

Protection and Survivability
The ASAP has a modular passive armour scheme. The basic protection includes the steel hull of the vehicle, augmented by spaced titanium-aluminium alloy. This protects the crew and systems from kinetic threats of up to 14.5mm caliber, as well as shrapnel and small explosive devices. To allow flexibility, vehicles are designed to accept bolt on/off additional armour, of which the armoured skirt is employed as standard in Knootoss. The crew compartments are protected by a Kevlar Spall Liner.

The platform is equipped with Iron Tide APS. This modular soft and hard kill system has been reconfigured to operate with the CAESAR battle management system and take full advantage of the systems of each specific vehicle it is mounted on. Infrared sensors located on sensor mast, a laser warning system and the Spiegel ground RADAR system are used to identify incoming threats in a 360 degrees arc around the protected vehicle. A speed compact processing unit is then used to allow the tracking, classification and engagement of threats. The software can use the data from the radar to identify threats and choose which threats to engage and which threats not to engage. It also chooses what counter measure to use against a threat. The processing unit is linked to the CAESAR system, allowing one unit to network with others.

A pair of twin-barrelled automatically reloading, fully stabilized, rotating launchers fire combustible, fin-stabilized 80mm projectiles that explode at less than 1 meter from the threat, causing it to destabilize and either fall apart in the air or go off target. This method is effective against both CE threats and KE threats. 12 projectiles are carried in the auto-reload magazines of the system. In turreted vehicles it is moreover connected to the turret traverse system, rendering it able to traverse the turret to fire smoke grenades if needed (requiring only a confirmation from the commander).

Active Electronic Countermeasures that are designed to passively defeat enemy anti-tank missiles by jamming their target designation and guidance systems to provide another layer of defence against incoming attacks. The system includes both a radio frequency jammer and a laser/infrared jammer. The R/F jammer is a high output unit which is programmed to work on frequencies used by radio guided munitions. As the missile nears the protected vehicle, the jammer outpowers the guidance signal, severing the tie between the missile and its launcher. The laser/infrared jammer works either by directing false guidance data at the incoming threat or by blinding it completely. The jammers are located in the sensor mast of the system.

Armaments
While each variant of the platform carries different systems, all come armed with a a 7.62mm medium machine gun, which can fire rapidly against infantry and other vulnerable targets. For close range encounters, the vehicle features a 12 tube 80mm grenade launcher system that is capable of working with the "Iron Tide" APS.

Crew accommodations
The driver is seated directly behind the engine bay with the commander (aside from turreted versions) slightly to his right and back. Both commander and driver have a separate hatch. Depending on the specific variant, the fighting compartment or turret is located to the rear of the vehicle. The crew and passenger seats are all of the suspended type, keeping them above the floor in case of an explosion underneath the vehicle. In variants that carry heavy munitions they are stored in fire resistant separate polymer casings, with blowout panels.

The vehicles carry 100 litres of water in NBC protected tanks, with cold/hot water ability. An air-conditioning system is installed as standard. The ASAP is capable of carrying four days worth of combat rations for it's crew and passengers.

Fire suppression
The crew and passenger compartments are both equipped with fire detectors and 4 bromochlorodifluoromethane (BCF) canisters. The canisters are operated either automatically by the detectors or manually by the crew. Two more canisters are located in the engine compartment and can be operated from the driver’s controls or from outside the vehicle. The driver and commander have red-light indicators for an engine fire. The diesel fuel for the engine is stored in two tanks in the back of the vehicle, with cut-off valves allowing the use of each tank separately.

NBC protection
An overpressure system pumps air from outside the vehicle through a system of filters and into to the vehicle, creating an overpressure that keeps contaminated air out if the vehicle fully buttoned. If it cannot be fully buttoned, each crewmember and passenger can use an individual, pressurized mask with a 90% field of vision. The overpressure system is integrated with an air-condition system but will operate even if that system is damaged.

Variants

Technical Specifications

Armoured Personnel Carrier (ASAP-APC)

Crew

3+10

Weight

19 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.7 meters

Width

3 meters

Height

2.35 meters

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

Designed to carry non-combat elements of combat units, the Armoured Personnel Carrier (ASAP-APC) is the platforms' basic variant. It has a modular troop compartment using a rail system to allow modifying the seat number and placement. This system allows for up to 10 passengers or none, clearing space for transporting equipment and supplies.

Technical Specifications

Infantry Fighting Vehicle (ASAP-IFV)

Crew

3+7

Weight

26.5 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.9 meters(gun forward)

Width

3 meters

Height

3 meters(turret roof)

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

100mm L30 Gun/Missile Launcher

Coaxial armament

30mm L80 Dual Feed automatic cannon
7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 450 kilometres (279 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Infantry Fighting Vehicle (ASAP-IFV) is meant to transport combat infantry during battle and provide supporting fire against all types of targets. Heavily armed, it is turreted, and equipped with a fully digital fire control system and electric turret traverse and stabilization. The FCS includes a gunners day and night thermal sight, and a commanders independent 360 degrees rotating day and night thermal sight. The system is capable of pixel lock. The sights are capable of displaying CAESAR battle management data over the real time image. The commander can "slave" the gun controls, and has full functionality of the FCS from his position.

The main weapon is a 100mm low velocity smooth bore gun capable of firing not only standard HE rounds but also 100mm gun launched missiles. It can be used to engage the full spectrum of ground targets from tanks to infantry at ranges of up to 8,000 meters. Ammunition is loaded by a carousel type autoloader. Coaxially mounted to the 100mm is a 30mm L80 cannon, firing a mix of AP and HE rounds at a rate of 350 rounds per minute. Firing in short bursts it is lethal to infantry and lightly armoured vehicles and saves the 100mm ammunition for harder targets. Also coaxially mounted is a 7.62mm medium machine gun, used to engage infantry and soft targets up to 1,000 meters away. Due to the large dimensions of the turret, the passenger capacity of the IFV variant is reduced to seven in total.

Technical Specifications

Self-Propelled Mortar (ASAP-SPM)

Crew

2+4

Weight

20 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.7 meters

Width

3 meters

Height

2.35 meters

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

120/81mm mortar

Commanders Armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Self-Propelled Mortar (ASAP-SPM) has a 120mm or 81mm mortar installed in a mount in the rear compartment of the vehicle. The mount is motorized and controlled by a fire control computer in the compartment. Targeting data is fed either automatically via the CAESAR battle management system or manually. The mortar can also be dismounted, allowing for its use outside the vehicle. The ASAP-SPM carries 70 or 100 rounds for its weapon depending on the calibre.

Technical Specifications

Fitter (ASAP-F)

Crew

2+5

Weight

21 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.7 meters

Width

3 meters

Height

2.8 meters(crane folded)

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Fitter (ASAP-F) mounts a crane on the roof of the base platform. The ASAP-Fitter is meant for technical squads in companies operating the ASAP platform. The crane is hydraulically powered and can be controlled from the roof or side of the ASAP. It is capable of lifting and fitting the engine and other automotive parts of the ASAP, as well as the modular armour plates. The passenger capacity has been reduced to five in order to fit the hydraulic system as well as allowing for internal carry of various repair equipment.

Technical Specifications

Armoured Command Vehicle (ASAP-HQ)

Crew

2+6

Weight

21 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.7 meters

Width

3 meters

Height

2.50 meters

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Armoured Command Vehicle (ASAP-HQ) is a tactical command vehicle meant for units employing the ASAP platform range. Similar to the ASAP-APC, it is slightly taller to allow more comfortable conditions. The HQ can fit far more radio systems than other WUAT variants(up to 8 full size sets), has specialized antenna bases for EW and long range communication systems, and a significantly lowered seating capacity. The HQ allows for deploying the forward HQ of a battalion outside of the vehicle, with storage for a generator, large tent, HQ furniture, screen and projector, and a 32-station land line switchboard.

Technical Specifications

PEIL Missile Launcher (ASAP-PEIL)

Crew

4

Weight

21.5 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.7 meters

Width

3 meters

Height

2.35 meters

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

2XTLFFR-150 ATGM launcher

Commander's Armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The PEIL Missile Launcher (ASAP-PEIL) is an Anti-tank missile (ATGM) carrier, intended for specialized anti-tank units attached to infantry forces. The crew a commander and driver located in their usual positions, and 2 weapons operators, seated behind the commander. The troop carrying capacity has been completely negated, to allow the carry of the "Assassin" anti-tank system.

In general the “Assassin” system has 6 sub systems: 1)A retractable, 2 rail launching system housed in the centre of the vehicle, and deployed before firing. Inside the vehicle is a loading system holding 16 more tubes, in two 8 tube carousels. After the two missiles are fired from the tubes on the launcher, the tubes are jettisoned. The launcher arm than lowers in to the hull and two new tubes are loaded. The rate of fire is up to 12 missiles per minute. 2) A day and night optical sight, located at the front of the vehicle. The system combines an electro-optic sight with a Thermal Imaging System for night operations. This sight is used for observation and for firing missiles in Fire and Forget mode. 3) Wave millimetre RADAR located near the optical sight. It has a theoretical range of 10,000 meters and allows accurate identification of targets at 8000 meters. The RADAR is used to direct the missile in the radio command mode. To avoid damaging the sensitive unit, it is also semi retractable. 4) A fire control system. This system collects data from the sight and the RADAR, displays it on the controls of both the weapons operators, and processes the commands from the controls to send them to the missile over a radio transmitter. 5) Radio transmitter with a range of 10,000 meters used to guide the missile in radio control mode. 6) The missile itself.

The “Assassin” has 5 modes of operation:

  1. Fire and Forget: The missile is aimed by the thermal imaging system prior to launch. The fire control system transmits target data to the missile through a physical connection on the launcher. The missile is launched and the IIR seeker identifies the target. The missile than guides itself to the target and attacks it in a top-attack path. This is the standard launch mode.

  2. Radio Command: The missile is aimed by the RADAR. The operator locks the RADAR on target and the RADAR than guides the launched missile to its target via a radio link. The missile attacks in a top-attack approach. This mode is used to engage targets at longer ranges, targets using thermal decoys, or targets using thermal reducing materials.

  3. Simultaneous Launch: A mode meant to allow firing two missiles simultaneously. One weapons operator uses the Radio Command mode while the other uses the other uses the Fire and Forget mode. Each aims at a different target. This allows firing both missiles at the exact time. This mode is very useful in ambushing armour, as it allows destroying many tanks in the first moment of engagement.

  4. Anti Helicopter: Essentially similar to the simultaneous, launch mode. The difference is that in this mode one weapons operator uses both systems to engage a single target. This means that two missiles are launched at the same time at the helicopter using two different guidance systems. The missiles engage the helicopter in a direct attack approach. This mode increases the chances of hit against a helicopter considerably.

  5. TMOT- Two Missiles One Target: This mode is used against targets with very advanced countermeasures and active protection systems. It is similar to the anti-helicopter mode but the missiles engage the target in the normal top attack approach.

Technical Specifications

Engineering Service Vehicle (ASAP-ESV)

Crew

3+8

Weight

23 metric tons combat ready(with plough)

Length

9.3 meters(with plough)

Width

3 meters

Height

2.85 meters(RWS top)

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

12.7mm heavy machine gun in Remote Weapon Station

Commanders armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 500 kilometres (310 miles)

Speed

100km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Engineering Service Vehicle (ASAP-ESV) is meant to carry squads of engineers into combat, clear mined areas and haul supplies needed for engineering operations. It is nearly identical to the APC variant, but carries several combat engineering systems. It also come standard with a 12.7mm machinegun in a remotely operated weapons station.

The first engineering system carried is a modular surface mine plough. The plough is fitted to the front of the vehicle, and can be modified to different shapes(V shaped for a single vehicle clearing a lane or diagonal shaped for using two vehicles in clearing a wider lane together). The plough is modular and allows installing further plates to make it taller or thicker for extra blast protection. Using hydraulic controls from within the commander's position, it can be raised, lowered and swivelled.

Mounted on the plough itself is another system, the magnetic signature duplicator. Using four emitter coils the system generates a magnetic signature sufficient to activate most magnetic triggered mines and IEDs, causing them to explode near the plough, and so away from the vehicle itself.

The third system installed on the ESV is a lane and obstacle marker system. This system is mounted on the rear hull, and meant allows the vehicle commander to mark lanes from within the ESV. The system includes two pneumatic marking pole dispensers that fire poles into the ground. Various types of markers are available including reflective, fluorescent and LED enhanced in various colours. Thanks to this system the ESV can mark lanes on the move for following forces without the need for the mounted engineers to dismount and do the work on foot(exposed and slow).

The ESV has a towing shackle as standard mounted on the rear and allowing it to tow various systems, such as a towed mine clearing line charge system comprising of a rocket launched charge capable of clearing a path some 100 meters long and 6-8 meters wide. The launcher is armoured, with the rocket being raised to firing position and fired from within the vehicle. Many other systems can be towed in place of the MicLic.

Technical Specifications

Multiple Launch Rocket System (ASAP-MLRS)

Crew

3

Weight

23-27 metric tons combat ready.

Length

7.9 meters (gun forward)

Width

3 meters

Height

3.3-3.9 meters(launcher top)

Armour

Spaced Titanium–Aluminium Alloy, Composite Ceramic, NERA, Kevlar spall liner

Primary armament

40X122mm rockets/12X ATGM/ 8X300mm Rockets

Commanders armament

7.62mm medium machine gun

Close range armaments

12 80mm grenade launchers

Engine

Zenviron serial hybrid-electric with dual 150 hp gas turbines, external charging and regenerative breaking

Suspension

Horstman In-Arm pneumatic suspension

Operational range

Electric range: 90 kilometres (55 miles)
Total range 450 kilometres (279 miles)

Speed

80km/h on road, 55km/h off-road, 10km/h on water.

Description

The Multiple Launch Rocket System (ASAP-MLRS) was designed to give a wide range of rocket artillery options to commanders of units that cannot deploy heavier MLRS systems. The hydraulically elevating and traversing launcher is capable of utilizing different rocket pods for different roles. This makes the vehicle a "jack of all trades" of short-long range rocket artillery, allowing expeditionary forces ease of logistics and preventing them from needing to deploy more than one rocket artillery system. The rocket pods were chosen over individual tubes for ease of logistics and prevention of damage to rockets in transport and storage. The launcher can carry two pods (of the same kind) at a time. Loading is done with crane equipped artillery ammunition carriers, replacing the entire pod.

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