by Max Barry

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«12. . .2,7982,7992,8002,8012,8022,8032,804. . .2,8072,808»

WHORES

IT BE TEA TIME.

OUR DOUBLE-CHEEKED-UP SNACKS:
- DONALD TRUMP'S LEFT TOE
- RED VELVET CAKE
- HORSE STEAK
- MY JUICY ASS

OUR SALACIOUS DRINKS:
- A GALLON OF TOMATO JUICE
- EARL GREY
- SPIT.
- BLACK COFFEE

OUR TITILLATING TOPICS FOR TALKING:
- DAVID LYNCH
- THE BATTLE OF STALINGRAD
- SOCIALISM
- YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MOTHER

Oh boy

Some black coffee and horse steak, please. You don't understand that I already eat this often but it's OK

>Battle of Stalingrad
Oh
Boy
What's better than a fight half-way propragandized by both the Ruskies and the Nazis?
>Socialism
I support a Socialist State that pours money into the military too. The failure of the West start at the RVB debates in the 80's over China and extend out to now with the coming loss of the Military budget.
Tl;dr
All come to understand we needed to leave on Orion, all come to understand it.

hey there's a new poll, y'all oughtta vote

I'll eat my juicy ass and drink some earl grey.

David Lynch: as a film student and hopefully a filmmaker in the future, he's one of my biggest influences. His aesthetic is completely unique and the absolute horror his films cause is astounding.

The Battle of Stalingrad: an ugly slog, but a lot of Nazis died. So it's okay.

Socialism: The ideal system of economics that I think we can achieve. My personal brand is libertarian socialism, a decentralized school that focuses on individual liberty along with economic freedom.

Tea Time? I was just about to go to bed.

Snacks: Horse Steak?.... I have problem with you now.

Drink: Black Coffee....As if I haven't seen that enough.

Topics: Stalingrad?.......... -gets lost in a PTSD flashback- ...... Hmm? A great victory. A shame that city is not under our care, but a relief it is under the care of someone I trust.

Tea Time!? It's been 84 years...

I'll have cake and coffee.

Stalingrad was quite a fascinating victory for the Reds. Let the fascists believe they've won and then you cut them off from the rest of their forces and kill and capture them all! Brilliant! :D

I'm becoming more and more revolutionary socialist everyday, because we got plague going on and mfs still be against universal healthcare like W H Y lick the boots of health insurance execs when there's probably better boots to lick that don't murder ten of thousands of Americans a year before Corona came around and made tens of millions lose their already mediocre employer-provided health insurance. So basically I'm at the point where I'd like an actual revolution (not a metaphorical one championed by Bernie) to get rid of these awful awful monsters running the show. Don't know if it'd succeed, but why not try amirite ;)

Nice to see the RMB getting more lively again.

I'll take red velvet cake and black coffee.

David Lynch: I've heard that he's a famous director, but I don't really study filmography.

The Battle of Stalingrad: It shows the extent to which the name of the place mattered. Hitler was so intent on capturing it for a strategic and a symbolic victory against the Soviets by taking the city named after their leader.

Socialism: It depends on which kind of socialism you're talking about. With market socialism, you have to wonder why it already hasn't taken over the economy if workers in any free market are able to create cooperatives that can compete with privately-run businesses. What it indicates is that said cooperatives generally don't operate as efficiently and as successfully as more traditional businesses do. After are, if they truly were better, then they would be much more competitive than they are today.

With non-market socialism, the problem is in figuring out what to replace the market with. In most cases, the free market has shown itself as being the most efficient means of distributing resources as buyers and sellers respond to price signals and the forces of supply and demand. Centrally planned economies have generally fallen behind due to the human calculation problem. No human or group of humans can plan something as complex as an entire economy, which has shown itself to be the case in the Soviet Union and Maoist China.

In addition, central planning centralizes economic power among a handful few, which gives them the ability to take advantage of their positions to enrich themselves at the expense of the proletariat they claim to represent. And with such a consolidation of economic power will inevitably come a consolidation of political power.

Post self-deleted by Jaslandia.

Lavan Tiri wrote:WHORES

IT BE TEA TIME.

OUR DOUBLE-CHEEKED-UP SNACKS:
- DONALD TRUMP'S LEFT TOE
- RED VELVET CAKE
- HORSE STEAK
- MY JUICY ASS

OUR SALACIOUS DRINKS:
- A GALLON OF TOMATO JUICE
- EARL GREY
- SPIT.
- BLACK COFFEE

OUR TITILLATING TOPICS FOR TALKING:
- DAVID LYNCH
- THE BATTLE OF STALINGRAD
- SOCIALISM
- YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MOTHER

I'll have cake and Earl Grey.

David Lynch: I know he's a director with a weird style, but I'm not really familiar with his work.

Stalingrad: A partly-pointless slog that served as a meat grinder for both the Soviets and the Nazis. The German Army may have had better odds if they focused elsewhere.

Socialism: For one thing, we need to establish what 'socialism' is. Assuming it's worker control over the means of production, it sounds nice, but capitalism with a welfare state does better in raising quality of life and maximizing economic growth and productivity. I'm sympathetic to the Nordic model, but that's not really 'socialist' I'd say.

Relationship with mother: Pretty good.

Lavan Tiri wrote:WHORES

IT BE TEA TIME.

OUR DOUBLE-CHEEKED-UP SNACKS:
- DONALD TRUMP'S LEFT TOE
- RED VELVET CAKE
- HORSE STEAK
- MY JUICY ASS

OUR SALACIOUS DRINKS:
- A GALLON OF TOMATO JUICE
- EARL GREY
- SPIT.
- BLACK COFFEE

OUR TITILLATING TOPICS FOR TALKING:
- DAVID LYNCH
- THE BATTLE OF STALINGRAD
- SOCIALISM
- YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MOTHER

I'll have the cake and tea. Tack.

David Lynch: I don't trust people called Lynch, for cultural reasons.

Stalingrad: If we're gonna discuss history, let's not be stereotypes and only care about World War II.

Socialism: Our launching pad. Capitalism has run its course and it's time for us to grow up as a species. I like think that we're slowly realizing that Marx was right, though I'm doubtful of America's capability for revolution. Americans love the taste of boot and their unique brand of fascism.

Relationship with my mother: Well, I just woke up from a nap to a very nasty text from her about the state of the kitchen, so I guess I'll go upstairs and see what that's about. Our relationship is broadly decent. Not great, but she does let me live here rent free at least for the time being.

Nuremgard wrote:Nice to see the RMB getting more lively again.

I will single-handedly drag this region back into life if I have to accidentally suppress every RMB post to do it

Lavan Tiri wrote:WHORES

IT BE TEA TIME.

OUR DOUBLE-CHEEKED-UP SNACKS:
- DONALD TRUMP'S LEFT TOE
- RED VELVET CAKE
- HORSE STEAK
- MY JUICY ASS

OUR SALACIOUS DRINKS:
- A GALLON OF TOMATO JUICE
- EARL GREY
- SPIT.
- BLACK COFFEE

OUR TITILLATING TOPICS FOR TALKING:
- DAVID LYNCH
- THE BATTLE OF STALINGRAD
- SOCIALISM
- YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR MOTHER

Red Velvet Cake and a black coffee please waiter.
David Lynch is one of the best filmmakers out there. The guy is mental and sticks to his guns and I love him for it. The fact that we got a new season of Twin Peaks in an age of hyper-consumerism is astonishing.
The Battle of Stalingrad been talked to death so here are some cool facts about the actual city. It was renamed to Volgograd in 1961 by Khrushchev's de-Stalinisation policies, trying to dismantle Stalin's cult of personality. Since this controversial decision; people have tried numerous times to rename the city back to its old name. This even includes monarchists who want it to be called Tsaritsyn; its ORIGINAL name.
Social Democracy is the future. I think lots more countries are gonna shift towards it as this century rolls along.
Love me mum. Love what she's done for me. Simple as.

Lex Caledonia wrote:Red Velvet Cake and a black coffee please waiter.
David Lynch is one of the best filmmakers out there. The guy is mental and sticks to his guns and I love him for it. The fact that we got a new season of Twin Peaks in an age of hyper-consumerism is astonishing.
The Battle of Stalingrad been talked to death so here are some cool facts about the actual city. It was renamed to Volgograd in 1961 by Khrushchev's de-Stalinisation policies, trying to dismantle Stalin's cult of personality. Since this controversial decision; people have tried numerous times to rename the city back to its old name. This even includes monarchists who want it to be called Tsaritsyn; its ORIGINAL name.
Social Democracy is the future. I think lots more countries are gonna shift towards it as this century rolls along.
Love me mum. Love what she's done for me. Simple as.

I think authoritarianism is the future sadly. China is ascending and populist demagogues are gaining power all over the world.

Nuremgard wrote:I think authoritarianism is the future sadly. China is ascending and populist demagogues are gaining power all over the world.

Agreed. I've been saying for a few months (years) that China was ascendant as the leader of the Hegemony. It's been a damned timeline since we assumed that they'd liberalize with their markets and ignored the folks who knew they wouldn't :/
I
Just
Want
Original
Flavor
Orion

Kalaron-A wrote:Agreed. I've been saying for a few months (years) that China was ascendant as the leader of the Hegemony. It's been a damned timeline since we assumed that they'd liberalize with their markets and ignored the folks who knew they wouldn't :/
I
Just
Want
Original
Flavor
Orion

China is as much likely to politically liberalise as much as I am likely to become the Queen of Sheba.

Nuremgard wrote:China is as much likely to politically liberalise as much as I am likely to become the Queen of Sheba.

The irony is that, if you read the first Bush's memoirs he pointedly called out how dangerous China could be when he was a diplomat.

Kalaron-A wrote:Vorton Harmonic "Mice". ;p

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/666728081918001162/731149647250456706/oscillating_1.jpg
A picture for one. An even number of these creatures run along the inside of a stable Vorton loop.
https://arxiv.org/abs/1303.3044
Tl;dr
Alien life is kyute/horrifying.

Nuremgard wrote:I think authoritarianism is the future sadly. China is ascending and populist demagogues are gaining power all over the world.

The problem with political authoritarianism is that it prevents economic dynamism as the elites of any particular authoritarian country will attempt to consolidate economic power for themselves at the expense of respect for private property and inclusive markets. And this prevents the creative destruction that allows for economic growth in the long-run. China's current growth is not going to inevitably continue unless the West allows China to enact its neocolonial policy in the developing world. After all, its recent growth is predicated upon the country moving closer to inclusive economic institutions with free markets. Either the political elites stamp this out to prevent themselves from becoming economic losers or a growing Chinese middle class puts pressure on the Beijing government to liberalize politically and move closer to a pluralist and democratic system of government.

China now is in a similar position as South Korea was a few decades ago, simultaneously having an authoritarian political system and a more liberal economic system. In the case of South Korea, that did eventually lead to political liberalization due to pressure from the new South Korean middle class that was well-educated enough to realize what was occurring in their country.

Gualimole wrote:The problem with political authoritarianism is that it prevents economic dynamism as the elites of any particular authoritarian country will attempt to consolidate economic power for themselves at the expense of respect for private property and inclusive markets. And this prevents the creative destruction that allows for economic growth in the long-run. China's current growth is not going to inevitably continue unless the West allows China to enact its neocolonial policy in the developing world. After all, its recent growth is predicated upon the country moving closer to inclusive economic institutions with free markets. Either the political elites stamp this out to prevent themselves from becoming economic losers or a growing Chinese middle class puts pressure on the Beijing government to liberalize politically and move closer to a pluralist and democratic system of government.

China now is in a similar position as South Korea was a few decades ago, simultaneously having an authoritarian political system and a more liberal economic system. In the case of South Korea, that did eventually lead to political liberalization due to pressure from the new South Korean middle class that was well-educated enough to realize what was occurring in their country.

I don't see China liberalising. People are either too brainwashed or too scared to challenge the government.

Nuremgard wrote:I don't see China liberalising. People are either too brainwashed or too scared to challenge the government.

People in China were actually quite outraged when they found out the Chinese government punished a doctor who first warned about the spread of COVID-19. While China's authoritarianism predicated on shame is powerful, its not invincible. And at the end of the day, China's political elites are concerned the most with their own well-being. They'll accept political reform if it saves themselves and they will clamp down on economic reforms to prevent competition from affecting their wealth. Either China liberalizes politically or it reverses its course on economic reforms. If it's the latter, then China's economic growth will slow down in much the same way as it did for the Soviets in the 70s.

Gualimole wrote:People in China were actually quite outraged when they found out the Chinese government punished a doctor who first warned about the spread of COVID-19. While China's authoritarianism predicated on shame is powerful, its not invincible. And at the end of the day, China's political elites are concerned the most with their own well-being. They'll accept political reform if it saves themselves and they will clamp down on economic reforms to prevent competition from affecting their wealth. Either China liberalizes politically or it reverses its course on economic reforms. If it's the latter, then China's economic growth will slow down in much the same way as it did for the Soviets in the 70s.

The USSR collapsed peacefully for the most part but if the Chinese regime falls, it will be much more violent imo.

Nuremgard wrote:The USSR collapsed peacefully for the most part but if the Chinese regime falls, it will be much more violent imo.

I predict that China will not collapse, but will rather eventually undertake a campaign of controlled liberalization to appease the public while maintaining the dominance of the ruling party. Think of it like Gorbachev's political reforms, but at a much slower pace. After all, the Chinese political elite is going to eventually see the writing on the wall.

Nuremgard wrote:The USSR collapsed peacefully for the most part but if the Chinese regime falls, it will be much more violent imo.

It'll also be much harder for them to fall considering the coming usage of AI to identify dissidents. UwU

Kalaron-A wrote:It'll also be much harder for them to fall considering the coming usage of AI to identify dissidents. UwU

The problem with technological progress is that it's a double-edged sword. It can oftentimes serve the interests of the political elites in increasing their control over the people, but it can also allow for the increased spread of information that can help people resist authoritarianism. It can also disrupt economies, which in China also means disrupting the political power of the political elites.

Gualimole wrote:I predict that China will not collapse, but will rather eventually undertake a campaign of controlled liberalization to appease the public while maintaining the dominance of the ruling party. Think of it like Gorbachev's political reforms, but at a much slower pace. After all, the Chinese political elite is going to eventually see the writing on the wall.

I don't see them reforming. I see them taking harsher and more brutal measures to crack down on dissent. And look at how quickly they are assimilating Hong Kong into the regime. Taiwan is next.

Kalaron-A wrote:It'll also be much harder for them to fall considering the coming usage of AI to identify dissidents. UwU

Indeed. We live in scary times.

«12. . .2,7982,7992,8002,8012,8022,8032,804. . .2,8072,808»

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