by Max Barry

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Region: The Coalition of Democratic Nations

Healthcare Investigation Closed, "No Evidence of Foul Play," says Auditing Board

    Last year when 3rd Prefect of Wannam, Kwan Long Tsin, stormed out of the Imperial Court over the healthcare issue, he clamed that the Civil Advisory was stealing from his prefectural treasury to secretly fund their own one-sided universal healthcare program. The Emperor himself guaranteed disciplinary action following results from the Imperial Examination and Auditing Board, which launched an investigation last year. Almost a year later, the investigation has finally concluded, and findings have determined that there was no credible evidence supporting Prefect Kwan's allegations. Prefect Kwan has been suspended from the Imperial Court for the time being for slandering the Civil Advisory and has been fined 634 Thousand Yun (6 Million 2019 USD) for wasting the Auditing Board's time.

    Talks regarding the bicameral Universal Healthcare plan has in the meantime stagnated, although a new proposal set forth by the Civil Directorate has gained traction among Imperial Court groups. Under this proposal, employers would foot the cost of insuring healthcare, easing the burden on the imperial treasuries and avoiding the issue that caused the 634 thousand Yun investigation. Detractors have raised a myriad of problems with this proposal, such as coverage for employees of small business owners and the self-employed. Lobbies from large companies such as Sam Ting Industries have expressed their concerns, citing the potential for hindered growth if the proposal is ratified. The debate marches on.

Judge Baau TV Show Stirs Up Interest in Law, Law Enforcement

    With the second season of Judge Baau television show airing, the NCB TV company is raking the cash, but it's not the only one benefitting from the show. Following the end of the first season, student interest surveys indicate a 200% increase of interest in legal and law enforcement professions. Applicants to Namjyut's universities with law programs have increased dramatically, with thousands more participants taking the Imperial Examinations for Law. Examination halls are packed at peak hours, and officer training schools are looking to expand given the influx of new students.

Hong Kong Housing Estates Draws in Residents

    The construction of housing estates in Hong Kong started by the municipal government in Hong Kong has proven successful, with hundreds of residents relocating to affordable homes in government-subsidized estates. Although the construction has proven to be a significant cost in the city's budget, Hong Kong continues to expand its subsidized housing program. Meanwhile, the prospect of affordable housing is drawing in new residents wary of the increasing cost of living in Punyu, growing Hong Kong as a result.

    "Hong Kong is not just a port that serves Punyu," says Mayor Chan Au King, "We will show the world that we matter. We start with housing. Homeless numbers will drop, crime will be lowered, and we foster the safety and security needed for business to thrive. Already new faces are coming in as part of our labor force. Factory workers, dock workers, skilled workers. Everyone is needed."

    The government of Hong Kong, hopping on to the legal bandwagon Judge Baau has generated, has invited prestigious figures in Namjyut law as lecturers to Hong Kong University to draw in students.

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